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Metabolic Testing at Home: Better Health Insights Covered by Your HSA

Metabolic Testing at Home: Better Health Insights Covered by Your HSA

Metabolic Testing at Home: Better Health Insights Covered by Your HSA

Metabolic Testing at Home: Better Health Insights Covered by Your HSA

Elevate your wellness journey with at-home metabolic testing. Learn how personalized insights can improve your health and how to pay for it with your HSA or FSA.

Elevate your wellness journey with at-home metabolic testing. Learn how personalized insights can improve your health and how to pay for it with your HSA or FSA.

Elevate your wellness journey with at-home metabolic testing. Learn how personalized insights can improve your health and how to pay for it with your HSA or FSA.

Elevate your wellness journey with at-home metabolic testing. Learn how personalized insights can improve your health and how to pay for it with your HSA or FSA.

December 4, 2023
December 4, 2023
December 4, 2023
December 4, 2023
Sam O'Keefe
Co-founder & CEO of Flex
Sam O'Keefe
Co-founder & CEO of Flex
Sam O'Keefe
Co-founder & CEO of Flex
Sam O'Keefe
Co-founder & CEO of Flex
iollo Metabolic Testing at Home: Better Health Insights Covered by Your HSA
iollo Metabolic Testing at Home: Better Health Insights Covered by Your HSA
iollo Metabolic Testing at Home: Better Health Insights Covered by Your HSA

Overview

Healthy living isn’t just reactive treatment to illness and injury, a preventive approach is better for you both in the short and long term, and on your wallet. Thanks to telehealth and home testing kids, you can be proactive about your health without having to go to the doctor’s office too.

Metabolic testing at home allows you to gain personalized insights about your health and body. These tests often evaluate things like hormones, gut microbiome, and even your DNA so that you can make informed decisions about lifestyle changes. Common reasons to take a metabolism test are to gain insight into how your body processes different nutrients, how diet and exercise affect your body, and whether you might have certain health conditions.

Best of all, you can use your Health Savings Account (HSA) or Flexible Savings Account (FSA) to pay for these tests to reduce out of pocket health care costs — with the help of Flex, of course.

What We’ll Cover About Metabolic Testing at Home

In this article, we’re going to answer a variety of questions about at-home Metabolism tests, including:

  • What is metabolic testing? 

  • What is metabolism?

  • What can you use metabolic and metabolism tests for?

  • What biomarkers are

  • Different kinds of biomarkers

  • What biomarkers can tell us about age-related diseases

  • What diseases can be detected with biomarker testing?

  • Things to consider in choosing an at home metabolic test

  • How to use your HSA or FSA to pay for metabolic testing at home

What Is Metabolic Testing?

Metabolic testing analyzes various aspects of an individual's metabolism. We’re going to do a bit of explaining here, so bear with us.

Okay, what is metabolism?

Metabolism refers to the chemical processes that occur within the body in order to maintain life. This is commonly thought of as — but not quite the same thing as — your metabolic rate, which is the number of calories your body uses per day in order to simply continue on, continuing on. 

Perhaps in preparation for a weight loss plan, you might have performed a Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) Test or Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) Test. These measure the number of calories your body burns in order to maintain your bodily functions (i.e., basic processes like breathing, circulation, and cell production). This offers a baseline for how many calories your body needs per day under normal circumstances. But this is just a small part of what metabolic testing can do for you.

What’s important to note is that your metabolism is influenced by a variety of factors, such as genetics, age, gender, body composition, and activity level, and you can test for and measure much more than just your VO2 max and BMR. In this guide, we’re going to talk about how metabolic tests can provide a comprehensive and personalized health review that allows you to make smarter decisions around lifestyle, nutrition, and fitness choices.

What can you use metabolic and metabolism tests for?

Metabolic and metabolism testing are useful for a few purposes:

  • Weight management: Understanding your metabolic rate can help you to tailor diet and exercise plans for more effective weight management.

  • Fitness optimization: Athletes and fitness enthusiasts may use metabolism testing to optimize training programs and improve performance.

  • Health assessment: Metabolism testing can be part of an overall health evaluation to identify metabolic disorders, nutritional deficiencies, or other disease-related issues.

From here on out, we’re going to focus on advanced metabolic tests that analyze biomarkers.

What are biomarkers?

Biomarkers are traits and small molecules — known as metabolites — that are measured within your blood, body fluids, and tissues. Analyzing your biomarkers provides insight about what is happening inside your body now, and can be used for things like disease diagnosis and monitoring.

Some examples of biomarkers include blood pressure, cortisol, gut microbiome-based toxins, amino acids, hormones, glucose, and a whole host of others. In fact, there are more than 40,000+ metabolite biomarkers in our blood alone.

Understanding an individual’s present levels and concentrations of metabolites is important because it helps tailor personalized treatments based on their unique biomarker profiles.

Different kinds of biomarkers

Biomarkers can be categorized into groups, each of which tell something different about your body.

  • Diagnostic biomarkers: Can be used to identify if you have a certain condition. 

  • Monitoring biomarkers: Can be looked at over time to see how a condition progresses.

  • Predictive biomarkers: Suggest how you may respond to a certain treatment.

  • Susceptibility or risk biomarkers: These can show if you have a precondition or suggest how likely you are to get a condition.

  • Prognostic biomarkers: Can indicate how your future with a disease will look. 

Biomarkers and age-related diseases

Further, biomarkers play a vital role in age-related diseases: Our partner, iollo provides some insight:

“While your genetic makeup gives you risk scores that can be used to indicate what might happen, your metabolome indicates what is happening in your body right now. Also, only 15% of age-related diseases are genetic. The other 85% are related to your blood metabolome.”

Understanding your metabolism, holistically, can help you to fine tune your food and exercise plans, and overall lifestyle choices. 

What diseases can be detected with biomarker testing?

Various diseases have metabolite biomarker “signatures” which means that there is a pattern or signal that can potentially be used for early detection, diagnosis, and monitoring. For example, high cholesterol levels are a common biomarker for heart disease risk. 

Here is a brief overview of biomarkers for common diseases:

Parkinson’s biomarker: Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects movement. There is no definitive biomarker, but a few might aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. For example: Genetic mutations, such as those in the LRRK2 or SNCA genes, have been associated with an increased risk; Alpha-synuclein is a protein that forms clumps in the brains of individuals with Parkinson's; Inflammation is thought to play a role in the progression of Parkinson's disease.

Cancer biomarker: There are a variety of biomarkers for cancer that can be detected in blood, urine, tissues, or other bodily fluids. Here are a few: CA 125 is a tumor biomarker that is associated with ovarian cancer; BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations are genetic biomarkers that indicate increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers; Ki-67 is a protein biomarker that suggests the level of cell proliferation in tumors.

Cardiovascular disease biomarkers: Cardiac biomarkers can help to evaluate heart function and can be useful in the early prediction or disease diagnosis. Some examples include: high levels of Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of heart disease; elevated levels of C-reactive Protein (CRP) may indicate inflammation, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease; and high concentrations of the enzyme Troponin may indicate damage to the heart muscle, as a result of a heart attack.

By being proactive about testing you may be able to detect early warning signs. To get tested for biomarkers, you can go to a clinical setting, laboratory, or increasingly common, take a test at home.

Things To Consider In Choosing An At Home Metabolic Test

If you choose to take an at-home test, here are a few things you’ll want to think about:

  • Ease-of-use: Many at-home blood tests are finger prick-based and can be a bit messy and painful. There are other methods, such as when collecting saliva, mucus, or stool samples, however you want to be mindful of what’s required. Some newer tests make getting a sample much simpler and virtually painless (see one example below)

  • Laboratories and test accuracy: How accurate is the test? And how is this being measured? You want tests that have been validated through research and are conducted using reliable equipment and methods. Look for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified Trusted Source labs that follow state and federal regulations. 

  • Privacy: This is highly personal information so you want to be confident and comfortable with how the testing company is using your information, storing it, and sharing it.

  • Further support: Sometimes results of these tests can have significant implications, or at the very least lead to further questions. Does the service offer additional support, such as follow-up phone consultation with a doctor to discuss test results? Or guidance on how to make practical lifestyle changes given the information?

How much does it cost to get a metabolic test?: Costs can vary widely based on a variety of factors such as the type of test, where it is conducted, and whether it is performed in a clinical setting or not. Also, is the test covered by health insurance or will you need to pay for it out of pocket or with your HSA or FSA

How to Use Your HSA/FSA to Pay For Metabolic Testing at Home

At home metabolic and metabolism tests are covered by your HSA or FSA.

If you need a refresher, your HSA (or employer-provided FSA) is like a bank account for out of pocket health care expenses. You can use these funds for many eligible medical expenses, such as doctor’s visits, prescription medicines, vision care, and even health and wellness products.

If you’re looking for eligible metabolism test kits online, let’s take a closer look at our partner, iollo, who offer one of the most comprehensive tests available.

iollo: Discover your metabolic health

Founded by metabolomic and computational biology experts from Stanford University and Cornell, iollo is one of the most all-inclusive ways to test for biomarkers at home. In fact, using their state-of-the-art collection device allows you to track over 500 blood biomarkers for personalized insights so that you can work towards improved health outcomes. Beyond analysis, iollo also provides health and diet coaching recommendations based on published studies that are known to positively impact the metabolome.

It couldn’t be easier, the test is self-administered from the comfort of your own home and utilizes a novel method to gather the sample from your tricep area — which is virtually painless. Then, the results are shared via their app.

Why it’s so much better with Flex

Flex simplifies the order process for at home metabolic testing kits, like iollo.

Here’s how it works:

  1. To buy a test from iollo, simply select the “Pay with HSA/FSA” option at checkout.

  2. You will be directed to our site where you need to enter a few details about yourself and your eligibility, which our clinical team will review. This will provide you with a Letter of Medical Necessity (LOMN) which is required to be IRS-compliant.

  3. Then simply enter your HSA or FSA card details and complete your transaction. 

That’s it. For your HSA, there is no need to collect receipts or submit for reimbursement. In some cases, your FSA may ask for further details, like a receipt.

Ready to explore the world of at home metabolic testing and learn more about yourself (or your family), all while saving money by using your HSA/FSA card?

Overview

Healthy living isn’t just reactive treatment to illness and injury, a preventive approach is better for you both in the short and long term, and on your wallet. Thanks to telehealth and home testing kids, you can be proactive about your health without having to go to the doctor’s office too.

Metabolic testing at home allows you to gain personalized insights about your health and body. These tests often evaluate things like hormones, gut microbiome, and even your DNA so that you can make informed decisions about lifestyle changes. Common reasons to take a metabolism test are to gain insight into how your body processes different nutrients, how diet and exercise affect your body, and whether you might have certain health conditions.

Best of all, you can use your Health Savings Account (HSA) or Flexible Savings Account (FSA) to pay for these tests to reduce out of pocket health care costs — with the help of Flex, of course.

What We’ll Cover About Metabolic Testing at Home

In this article, we’re going to answer a variety of questions about at-home Metabolism tests, including:

  • What is metabolic testing? 

  • What is metabolism?

  • What can you use metabolic and metabolism tests for?

  • What biomarkers are

  • Different kinds of biomarkers

  • What biomarkers can tell us about age-related diseases

  • What diseases can be detected with biomarker testing?

  • Things to consider in choosing an at home metabolic test

  • How to use your HSA or FSA to pay for metabolic testing at home

What Is Metabolic Testing?

Metabolic testing analyzes various aspects of an individual's metabolism. We’re going to do a bit of explaining here, so bear with us.

Okay, what is metabolism?

Metabolism refers to the chemical processes that occur within the body in order to maintain life. This is commonly thought of as — but not quite the same thing as — your metabolic rate, which is the number of calories your body uses per day in order to simply continue on, continuing on. 

Perhaps in preparation for a weight loss plan, you might have performed a Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) Test or Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) Test. These measure the number of calories your body burns in order to maintain your bodily functions (i.e., basic processes like breathing, circulation, and cell production). This offers a baseline for how many calories your body needs per day under normal circumstances. But this is just a small part of what metabolic testing can do for you.

What’s important to note is that your metabolism is influenced by a variety of factors, such as genetics, age, gender, body composition, and activity level, and you can test for and measure much more than just your VO2 max and BMR. In this guide, we’re going to talk about how metabolic tests can provide a comprehensive and personalized health review that allows you to make smarter decisions around lifestyle, nutrition, and fitness choices.

What can you use metabolic and metabolism tests for?

Metabolic and metabolism testing are useful for a few purposes:

  • Weight management: Understanding your metabolic rate can help you to tailor diet and exercise plans for more effective weight management.

  • Fitness optimization: Athletes and fitness enthusiasts may use metabolism testing to optimize training programs and improve performance.

  • Health assessment: Metabolism testing can be part of an overall health evaluation to identify metabolic disorders, nutritional deficiencies, or other disease-related issues.

From here on out, we’re going to focus on advanced metabolic tests that analyze biomarkers.

What are biomarkers?

Biomarkers are traits and small molecules — known as metabolites — that are measured within your blood, body fluids, and tissues. Analyzing your biomarkers provides insight about what is happening inside your body now, and can be used for things like disease diagnosis and monitoring.

Some examples of biomarkers include blood pressure, cortisol, gut microbiome-based toxins, amino acids, hormones, glucose, and a whole host of others. In fact, there are more than 40,000+ metabolite biomarkers in our blood alone.

Understanding an individual’s present levels and concentrations of metabolites is important because it helps tailor personalized treatments based on their unique biomarker profiles.

Different kinds of biomarkers

Biomarkers can be categorized into groups, each of which tell something different about your body.

  • Diagnostic biomarkers: Can be used to identify if you have a certain condition. 

  • Monitoring biomarkers: Can be looked at over time to see how a condition progresses.

  • Predictive biomarkers: Suggest how you may respond to a certain treatment.

  • Susceptibility or risk biomarkers: These can show if you have a precondition or suggest how likely you are to get a condition.

  • Prognostic biomarkers: Can indicate how your future with a disease will look. 

Biomarkers and age-related diseases

Further, biomarkers play a vital role in age-related diseases: Our partner, iollo provides some insight:

“While your genetic makeup gives you risk scores that can be used to indicate what might happen, your metabolome indicates what is happening in your body right now. Also, only 15% of age-related diseases are genetic. The other 85% are related to your blood metabolome.”

Understanding your metabolism, holistically, can help you to fine tune your food and exercise plans, and overall lifestyle choices. 

What diseases can be detected with biomarker testing?

Various diseases have metabolite biomarker “signatures” which means that there is a pattern or signal that can potentially be used for early detection, diagnosis, and monitoring. For example, high cholesterol levels are a common biomarker for heart disease risk. 

Here is a brief overview of biomarkers for common diseases:

Parkinson’s biomarker: Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects movement. There is no definitive biomarker, but a few might aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. For example: Genetic mutations, such as those in the LRRK2 or SNCA genes, have been associated with an increased risk; Alpha-synuclein is a protein that forms clumps in the brains of individuals with Parkinson's; Inflammation is thought to play a role in the progression of Parkinson's disease.

Cancer biomarker: There are a variety of biomarkers for cancer that can be detected in blood, urine, tissues, or other bodily fluids. Here are a few: CA 125 is a tumor biomarker that is associated with ovarian cancer; BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations are genetic biomarkers that indicate increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers; Ki-67 is a protein biomarker that suggests the level of cell proliferation in tumors.

Cardiovascular disease biomarkers: Cardiac biomarkers can help to evaluate heart function and can be useful in the early prediction or disease diagnosis. Some examples include: high levels of Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of heart disease; elevated levels of C-reactive Protein (CRP) may indicate inflammation, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease; and high concentrations of the enzyme Troponin may indicate damage to the heart muscle, as a result of a heart attack.

By being proactive about testing you may be able to detect early warning signs. To get tested for biomarkers, you can go to a clinical setting, laboratory, or increasingly common, take a test at home.

Things To Consider In Choosing An At Home Metabolic Test

If you choose to take an at-home test, here are a few things you’ll want to think about:

  • Ease-of-use: Many at-home blood tests are finger prick-based and can be a bit messy and painful. There are other methods, such as when collecting saliva, mucus, or stool samples, however you want to be mindful of what’s required. Some newer tests make getting a sample much simpler and virtually painless (see one example below)

  • Laboratories and test accuracy: How accurate is the test? And how is this being measured? You want tests that have been validated through research and are conducted using reliable equipment and methods. Look for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified Trusted Source labs that follow state and federal regulations. 

  • Privacy: This is highly personal information so you want to be confident and comfortable with how the testing company is using your information, storing it, and sharing it.

  • Further support: Sometimes results of these tests can have significant implications, or at the very least lead to further questions. Does the service offer additional support, such as follow-up phone consultation with a doctor to discuss test results? Or guidance on how to make practical lifestyle changes given the information?

How much does it cost to get a metabolic test?: Costs can vary widely based on a variety of factors such as the type of test, where it is conducted, and whether it is performed in a clinical setting or not. Also, is the test covered by health insurance or will you need to pay for it out of pocket or with your HSA or FSA

How to Use Your HSA/FSA to Pay For Metabolic Testing at Home

At home metabolic and metabolism tests are covered by your HSA or FSA.

If you need a refresher, your HSA (or employer-provided FSA) is like a bank account for out of pocket health care expenses. You can use these funds for many eligible medical expenses, such as doctor’s visits, prescription medicines, vision care, and even health and wellness products.

If you’re looking for eligible metabolism test kits online, let’s take a closer look at our partner, iollo, who offer one of the most comprehensive tests available.

iollo: Discover your metabolic health

Founded by metabolomic and computational biology experts from Stanford University and Cornell, iollo is one of the most all-inclusive ways to test for biomarkers at home. In fact, using their state-of-the-art collection device allows you to track over 500 blood biomarkers for personalized insights so that you can work towards improved health outcomes. Beyond analysis, iollo also provides health and diet coaching recommendations based on published studies that are known to positively impact the metabolome.

It couldn’t be easier, the test is self-administered from the comfort of your own home and utilizes a novel method to gather the sample from your tricep area — which is virtually painless. Then, the results are shared via their app.

Why it’s so much better with Flex

Flex simplifies the order process for at home metabolic testing kits, like iollo.

Here’s how it works:

  1. To buy a test from iollo, simply select the “Pay with HSA/FSA” option at checkout.

  2. You will be directed to our site where you need to enter a few details about yourself and your eligibility, which our clinical team will review. This will provide you with a Letter of Medical Necessity (LOMN) which is required to be IRS-compliant.

  3. Then simply enter your HSA or FSA card details and complete your transaction. 

That’s it. For your HSA, there is no need to collect receipts or submit for reimbursement. In some cases, your FSA may ask for further details, like a receipt.

Ready to explore the world of at home metabolic testing and learn more about yourself (or your family), all while saving money by using your HSA/FSA card?

Overview

Healthy living isn’t just reactive treatment to illness and injury, a preventive approach is better for you both in the short and long term, and on your wallet. Thanks to telehealth and home testing kids, you can be proactive about your health without having to go to the doctor’s office too.

Metabolic testing at home allows you to gain personalized insights about your health and body. These tests often evaluate things like hormones, gut microbiome, and even your DNA so that you can make informed decisions about lifestyle changes. Common reasons to take a metabolism test are to gain insight into how your body processes different nutrients, how diet and exercise affect your body, and whether you might have certain health conditions.

Best of all, you can use your Health Savings Account (HSA) or Flexible Savings Account (FSA) to pay for these tests to reduce out of pocket health care costs — with the help of Flex, of course.

What We’ll Cover About Metabolic Testing at Home

In this article, we’re going to answer a variety of questions about at-home Metabolism tests, including:

  • What is metabolic testing? 

  • What is metabolism?

  • What can you use metabolic and metabolism tests for?

  • What biomarkers are

  • Different kinds of biomarkers

  • What biomarkers can tell us about age-related diseases

  • What diseases can be detected with biomarker testing?

  • Things to consider in choosing an at home metabolic test

  • How to use your HSA or FSA to pay for metabolic testing at home

What Is Metabolic Testing?

Metabolic testing analyzes various aspects of an individual's metabolism. We’re going to do a bit of explaining here, so bear with us.

Okay, what is metabolism?

Metabolism refers to the chemical processes that occur within the body in order to maintain life. This is commonly thought of as — but not quite the same thing as — your metabolic rate, which is the number of calories your body uses per day in order to simply continue on, continuing on. 

Perhaps in preparation for a weight loss plan, you might have performed a Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) Test or Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) Test. These measure the number of calories your body burns in order to maintain your bodily functions (i.e., basic processes like breathing, circulation, and cell production). This offers a baseline for how many calories your body needs per day under normal circumstances. But this is just a small part of what metabolic testing can do for you.

What’s important to note is that your metabolism is influenced by a variety of factors, such as genetics, age, gender, body composition, and activity level, and you can test for and measure much more than just your VO2 max and BMR. In this guide, we’re going to talk about how metabolic tests can provide a comprehensive and personalized health review that allows you to make smarter decisions around lifestyle, nutrition, and fitness choices.

What can you use metabolic and metabolism tests for?

Metabolic and metabolism testing are useful for a few purposes:

  • Weight management: Understanding your metabolic rate can help you to tailor diet and exercise plans for more effective weight management.

  • Fitness optimization: Athletes and fitness enthusiasts may use metabolism testing to optimize training programs and improve performance.

  • Health assessment: Metabolism testing can be part of an overall health evaluation to identify metabolic disorders, nutritional deficiencies, or other disease-related issues.

From here on out, we’re going to focus on advanced metabolic tests that analyze biomarkers.

What are biomarkers?

Biomarkers are traits and small molecules — known as metabolites — that are measured within your blood, body fluids, and tissues. Analyzing your biomarkers provides insight about what is happening inside your body now, and can be used for things like disease diagnosis and monitoring.

Some examples of biomarkers include blood pressure, cortisol, gut microbiome-based toxins, amino acids, hormones, glucose, and a whole host of others. In fact, there are more than 40,000+ metabolite biomarkers in our blood alone.

Understanding an individual’s present levels and concentrations of metabolites is important because it helps tailor personalized treatments based on their unique biomarker profiles.

Different kinds of biomarkers

Biomarkers can be categorized into groups, each of which tell something different about your body.

  • Diagnostic biomarkers: Can be used to identify if you have a certain condition. 

  • Monitoring biomarkers: Can be looked at over time to see how a condition progresses.

  • Predictive biomarkers: Suggest how you may respond to a certain treatment.

  • Susceptibility or risk biomarkers: These can show if you have a precondition or suggest how likely you are to get a condition.

  • Prognostic biomarkers: Can indicate how your future with a disease will look. 

Biomarkers and age-related diseases

Further, biomarkers play a vital role in age-related diseases: Our partner, iollo provides some insight:

“While your genetic makeup gives you risk scores that can be used to indicate what might happen, your metabolome indicates what is happening in your body right now. Also, only 15% of age-related diseases are genetic. The other 85% are related to your blood metabolome.”

Understanding your metabolism, holistically, can help you to fine tune your food and exercise plans, and overall lifestyle choices. 

What diseases can be detected with biomarker testing?

Various diseases have metabolite biomarker “signatures” which means that there is a pattern or signal that can potentially be used for early detection, diagnosis, and monitoring. For example, high cholesterol levels are a common biomarker for heart disease risk. 

Here is a brief overview of biomarkers for common diseases:

Parkinson’s biomarker: Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects movement. There is no definitive biomarker, but a few might aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. For example: Genetic mutations, such as those in the LRRK2 or SNCA genes, have been associated with an increased risk; Alpha-synuclein is a protein that forms clumps in the brains of individuals with Parkinson's; Inflammation is thought to play a role in the progression of Parkinson's disease.

Cancer biomarker: There are a variety of biomarkers for cancer that can be detected in blood, urine, tissues, or other bodily fluids. Here are a few: CA 125 is a tumor biomarker that is associated with ovarian cancer; BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations are genetic biomarkers that indicate increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers; Ki-67 is a protein biomarker that suggests the level of cell proliferation in tumors.

Cardiovascular disease biomarkers: Cardiac biomarkers can help to evaluate heart function and can be useful in the early prediction or disease diagnosis. Some examples include: high levels of Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of heart disease; elevated levels of C-reactive Protein (CRP) may indicate inflammation, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease; and high concentrations of the enzyme Troponin may indicate damage to the heart muscle, as a result of a heart attack.

By being proactive about testing you may be able to detect early warning signs. To get tested for biomarkers, you can go to a clinical setting, laboratory, or increasingly common, take a test at home.

Things To Consider In Choosing An At Home Metabolic Test

If you choose to take an at-home test, here are a few things you’ll want to think about:

  • Ease-of-use: Many at-home blood tests are finger prick-based and can be a bit messy and painful. There are other methods, such as when collecting saliva, mucus, or stool samples, however you want to be mindful of what’s required. Some newer tests make getting a sample much simpler and virtually painless (see one example below)

  • Laboratories and test accuracy: How accurate is the test? And how is this being measured? You want tests that have been validated through research and are conducted using reliable equipment and methods. Look for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified Trusted Source labs that follow state and federal regulations. 

  • Privacy: This is highly personal information so you want to be confident and comfortable with how the testing company is using your information, storing it, and sharing it.

  • Further support: Sometimes results of these tests can have significant implications, or at the very least lead to further questions. Does the service offer additional support, such as follow-up phone consultation with a doctor to discuss test results? Or guidance on how to make practical lifestyle changes given the information?

How much does it cost to get a metabolic test?: Costs can vary widely based on a variety of factors such as the type of test, where it is conducted, and whether it is performed in a clinical setting or not. Also, is the test covered by health insurance or will you need to pay for it out of pocket or with your HSA or FSA

How to Use Your HSA/FSA to Pay For Metabolic Testing at Home

At home metabolic and metabolism tests are covered by your HSA or FSA.

If you need a refresher, your HSA (or employer-provided FSA) is like a bank account for out of pocket health care expenses. You can use these funds for many eligible medical expenses, such as doctor’s visits, prescription medicines, vision care, and even health and wellness products.

If you’re looking for eligible metabolism test kits online, let’s take a closer look at our partner, iollo, who offer one of the most comprehensive tests available.

iollo: Discover your metabolic health

Founded by metabolomic and computational biology experts from Stanford University and Cornell, iollo is one of the most all-inclusive ways to test for biomarkers at home. In fact, using their state-of-the-art collection device allows you to track over 500 blood biomarkers for personalized insights so that you can work towards improved health outcomes. Beyond analysis, iollo also provides health and diet coaching recommendations based on published studies that are known to positively impact the metabolome.

It couldn’t be easier, the test is self-administered from the comfort of your own home and utilizes a novel method to gather the sample from your tricep area — which is virtually painless. Then, the results are shared via their app.

Why it’s so much better with Flex

Flex simplifies the order process for at home metabolic testing kits, like iollo.

Here’s how it works:

  1. To buy a test from iollo, simply select the “Pay with HSA/FSA” option at checkout.

  2. You will be directed to our site where you need to enter a few details about yourself and your eligibility, which our clinical team will review. This will provide you with a Letter of Medical Necessity (LOMN) which is required to be IRS-compliant.

  3. Then simply enter your HSA or FSA card details and complete your transaction. 

That’s it. For your HSA, there is no need to collect receipts or submit for reimbursement. In some cases, your FSA may ask for further details, like a receipt.

Ready to explore the world of at home metabolic testing and learn more about yourself (or your family), all while saving money by using your HSA/FSA card?

Overview

Healthy living isn’t just reactive treatment to illness and injury, a preventive approach is better for you both in the short and long term, and on your wallet. Thanks to telehealth and home testing kids, you can be proactive about your health without having to go to the doctor’s office too.

Metabolic testing at home allows you to gain personalized insights about your health and body. These tests often evaluate things like hormones, gut microbiome, and even your DNA so that you can make informed decisions about lifestyle changes. Common reasons to take a metabolism test are to gain insight into how your body processes different nutrients, how diet and exercise affect your body, and whether you might have certain health conditions.

Best of all, you can use your Health Savings Account (HSA) or Flexible Savings Account (FSA) to pay for these tests to reduce out of pocket health care costs — with the help of Flex, of course.

What We’ll Cover About Metabolic Testing at Home

In this article, we’re going to answer a variety of questions about at-home Metabolism tests, including:

  • What is metabolic testing? 

  • What is metabolism?

  • What can you use metabolic and metabolism tests for?

  • What biomarkers are

  • Different kinds of biomarkers

  • What biomarkers can tell us about age-related diseases

  • What diseases can be detected with biomarker testing?

  • Things to consider in choosing an at home metabolic test

  • How to use your HSA or FSA to pay for metabolic testing at home

What Is Metabolic Testing?

Metabolic testing analyzes various aspects of an individual's metabolism. We’re going to do a bit of explaining here, so bear with us.

Okay, what is metabolism?

Metabolism refers to the chemical processes that occur within the body in order to maintain life. This is commonly thought of as — but not quite the same thing as — your metabolic rate, which is the number of calories your body uses per day in order to simply continue on, continuing on. 

Perhaps in preparation for a weight loss plan, you might have performed a Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) Test or Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) Test. These measure the number of calories your body burns in order to maintain your bodily functions (i.e., basic processes like breathing, circulation, and cell production). This offers a baseline for how many calories your body needs per day under normal circumstances. But this is just a small part of what metabolic testing can do for you.

What’s important to note is that your metabolism is influenced by a variety of factors, such as genetics, age, gender, body composition, and activity level, and you can test for and measure much more than just your VO2 max and BMR. In this guide, we’re going to talk about how metabolic tests can provide a comprehensive and personalized health review that allows you to make smarter decisions around lifestyle, nutrition, and fitness choices.

What can you use metabolic and metabolism tests for?

Metabolic and metabolism testing are useful for a few purposes:

  • Weight management: Understanding your metabolic rate can help you to tailor diet and exercise plans for more effective weight management.

  • Fitness optimization: Athletes and fitness enthusiasts may use metabolism testing to optimize training programs and improve performance.

  • Health assessment: Metabolism testing can be part of an overall health evaluation to identify metabolic disorders, nutritional deficiencies, or other disease-related issues.

From here on out, we’re going to focus on advanced metabolic tests that analyze biomarkers.

What are biomarkers?

Biomarkers are traits and small molecules — known as metabolites — that are measured within your blood, body fluids, and tissues. Analyzing your biomarkers provides insight about what is happening inside your body now, and can be used for things like disease diagnosis and monitoring.

Some examples of biomarkers include blood pressure, cortisol, gut microbiome-based toxins, amino acids, hormones, glucose, and a whole host of others. In fact, there are more than 40,000+ metabolite biomarkers in our blood alone.

Understanding an individual’s present levels and concentrations of metabolites is important because it helps tailor personalized treatments based on their unique biomarker profiles.

Different kinds of biomarkers

Biomarkers can be categorized into groups, each of which tell something different about your body.

  • Diagnostic biomarkers: Can be used to identify if you have a certain condition. 

  • Monitoring biomarkers: Can be looked at over time to see how a condition progresses.

  • Predictive biomarkers: Suggest how you may respond to a certain treatment.

  • Susceptibility or risk biomarkers: These can show if you have a precondition or suggest how likely you are to get a condition.

  • Prognostic biomarkers: Can indicate how your future with a disease will look. 

Biomarkers and age-related diseases

Further, biomarkers play a vital role in age-related diseases: Our partner, iollo provides some insight:

“While your genetic makeup gives you risk scores that can be used to indicate what might happen, your metabolome indicates what is happening in your body right now. Also, only 15% of age-related diseases are genetic. The other 85% are related to your blood metabolome.”

Understanding your metabolism, holistically, can help you to fine tune your food and exercise plans, and overall lifestyle choices. 

What diseases can be detected with biomarker testing?

Various diseases have metabolite biomarker “signatures” which means that there is a pattern or signal that can potentially be used for early detection, diagnosis, and monitoring. For example, high cholesterol levels are a common biomarker for heart disease risk. 

Here is a brief overview of biomarkers for common diseases:

Parkinson’s biomarker: Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects movement. There is no definitive biomarker, but a few might aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. For example: Genetic mutations, such as those in the LRRK2 or SNCA genes, have been associated with an increased risk; Alpha-synuclein is a protein that forms clumps in the brains of individuals with Parkinson's; Inflammation is thought to play a role in the progression of Parkinson's disease.

Cancer biomarker: There are a variety of biomarkers for cancer that can be detected in blood, urine, tissues, or other bodily fluids. Here are a few: CA 125 is a tumor biomarker that is associated with ovarian cancer; BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations are genetic biomarkers that indicate increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers; Ki-67 is a protein biomarker that suggests the level of cell proliferation in tumors.

Cardiovascular disease biomarkers: Cardiac biomarkers can help to evaluate heart function and can be useful in the early prediction or disease diagnosis. Some examples include: high levels of Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of heart disease; elevated levels of C-reactive Protein (CRP) may indicate inflammation, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease; and high concentrations of the enzyme Troponin may indicate damage to the heart muscle, as a result of a heart attack.

By being proactive about testing you may be able to detect early warning signs. To get tested for biomarkers, you can go to a clinical setting, laboratory, or increasingly common, take a test at home.

Things To Consider In Choosing An At Home Metabolic Test

If you choose to take an at-home test, here are a few things you’ll want to think about:

  • Ease-of-use: Many at-home blood tests are finger prick-based and can be a bit messy and painful. There are other methods, such as when collecting saliva, mucus, or stool samples, however you want to be mindful of what’s required. Some newer tests make getting a sample much simpler and virtually painless (see one example below)

  • Laboratories and test accuracy: How accurate is the test? And how is this being measured? You want tests that have been validated through research and are conducted using reliable equipment and methods. Look for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified Trusted Source labs that follow state and federal regulations. 

  • Privacy: This is highly personal information so you want to be confident and comfortable with how the testing company is using your information, storing it, and sharing it.

  • Further support: Sometimes results of these tests can have significant implications, or at the very least lead to further questions. Does the service offer additional support, such as follow-up phone consultation with a doctor to discuss test results? Or guidance on how to make practical lifestyle changes given the information?

How much does it cost to get a metabolic test?: Costs can vary widely based on a variety of factors such as the type of test, where it is conducted, and whether it is performed in a clinical setting or not. Also, is the test covered by health insurance or will you need to pay for it out of pocket or with your HSA or FSA

How to Use Your HSA/FSA to Pay For Metabolic Testing at Home

At home metabolic and metabolism tests are covered by your HSA or FSA.

If you need a refresher, your HSA (or employer-provided FSA) is like a bank account for out of pocket health care expenses. You can use these funds for many eligible medical expenses, such as doctor’s visits, prescription medicines, vision care, and even health and wellness products.

If you’re looking for eligible metabolism test kits online, let’s take a closer look at our partner, iollo, who offer one of the most comprehensive tests available.

iollo: Discover your metabolic health

Founded by metabolomic and computational biology experts from Stanford University and Cornell, iollo is one of the most all-inclusive ways to test for biomarkers at home. In fact, using their state-of-the-art collection device allows you to track over 500 blood biomarkers for personalized insights so that you can work towards improved health outcomes. Beyond analysis, iollo also provides health and diet coaching recommendations based on published studies that are known to positively impact the metabolome.

It couldn’t be easier, the test is self-administered from the comfort of your own home and utilizes a novel method to gather the sample from your tricep area — which is virtually painless. Then, the results are shared via their app.

Why it’s so much better with Flex

Flex simplifies the order process for at home metabolic testing kits, like iollo.

Here’s how it works:

  1. To buy a test from iollo, simply select the “Pay with HSA/FSA” option at checkout.

  2. You will be directed to our site where you need to enter a few details about yourself and your eligibility, which our clinical team will review. This will provide you with a Letter of Medical Necessity (LOMN) which is required to be IRS-compliant.

  3. Then simply enter your HSA or FSA card details and complete your transaction. 

That’s it. For your HSA, there is no need to collect receipts or submit for reimbursement. In some cases, your FSA may ask for further details, like a receipt.

Ready to explore the world of at home metabolic testing and learn more about yourself (or your family), all while saving money by using your HSA/FSA card?

Flex is a modern marketplace for consumers to discover and purchase HSA/FSA eligible products. From fitness and nutrition, to sleep and mental health, Flex takes a holistic view of healthcare and enables consumers to use their pre-tax money to do the same.